Bill C-51: What Did We Learn About the Government’s Intentions from the Clause-by-Clause – National Security Law Blog –

http://craigforcese.squarespace.com/national-security-law-blog/2015/4/1/bill-c-51-what-did-we-learn-about-the-governments-intentions.html

“1. Powers will allow CSIS to breach law or the Charter, with warrant domestically

At issue is proposed s.12.1(3): “The Service shall not take measures to reduce a threat to the security of Canada if those measures will contravene a right or freedom guaranteed by the Canadian Charter
of Rights and Freedoms or will be contrary to other Canadian law, unless the Service
is authorized to take them by a warrant issued under section 21.1″(emphasis added).”

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Firefox & Bill C-51

The following is a quote from:-

https://blog.mozilla.org/netpolicy/2015/03/25/information-sharing-debates-continuing-in-problematic-directions/

Mozilla’s official blog on open Internet policy initiatives and developments

“Meanwhile in Canada, the Canadian Parliament is considering an even more concerning bill, C-51, the Anti-Terrorism Act of 2015. C-51 is sweeping in scope, including granting Canadian intelligence agencies CSIS and CSE new authority for offensive online attacks, as well as allowing these agencies to obtain significant amounts of information held by the Canadian government. The open-ended internal information-sharing exceptions contained in the bill erode the relationship between individuals and their government by removing the compartmentalization that allows Canadians to provide the government some of their most private information (for census, tax compliance, health services, and a range of other purposes) and trust that that information will be used for only its original purposes. This compartmentalization, currently a requirement of the Privacy Act, will not exist after Bill C-51 comes into force.”