An Insulator advocacy update from ‘Up North’ Canada Building Trades/Local 95

The asbestos national ban was a particularly significant victory for Canada’s building trades, and of course the Insulators, who work on the front lines helping to protect society from the harms of this deadly substance and often put themselves, their families and loved ones in harm’s way.

The Insulators led the charge for the asbestos ban. They are also holding the government accountable to ensure they follow through on their promise – and part of following through is addressing the legacy left behind in our buildings and our workers. Canada’s Insulators are focused on supporting a national strategy for dealing with the legacy of asbestos, starting with a National Patient Registry for Mesothelioma – the very rare type of cancer whose victims can almost always trace their disease back to asbestos exposure.

Working closely with Canada’s Building Trades Union (CBTU), the Insulators are advocating for the patient registry as part of completing the work begun under the asbestos ban. In July, International Vice President Paul Faulkner and Local 95 Government and Community Relations Director Adam Melnick, joined forces with CBTU Executive Director Arlene Dunn and Dr. Alec Farquhar, from Asbestos Free Canada, in a pivotal meeting with the office of the Minister of Labour to discuss this proposal. This meeting was the culmination of considerable lobbying over many months, including the submission of a detailed briefing notes prepared in collaboration with the Canadian Mesothelioma Foundation.

via An Insulator advocacy update from ‘Up North’

Trump and the Auto Workers

Trump’s intention, announced Wednesday, to take a fresh look at federal regulations covering the fuel efficiency of cars and trucks was widely viewed as a move against Obama-era environmental measures. Trump views the regulations as an impediment to economic growth.

California, the largest economy in the United States, said it would join a legal challenge to fight proposed changes to the regulations.

via Canadian auto workers union takes aim at Trump on fuel standards: ‘I can’t figure out where his head is at’ | Financial Post

Ethics and union bylaws

At a time when my Union is going through some transitional changes this article seems most timely.

New Unionism Network blog

Phil Lillies is an internal auditor with a deep interest in workplace democracy. Based in Canada, he has spent ten years applying his training in philosophy and organizational development to the study of internal workings of labour and community organizations. In this article he focuses on bylaws — the rules and regulations that do so much to reflect and condition union culture at local level. He offers some reflections on how to write bylaws that will help create a democratic, inclusive organization… one that will inspire and empower its members to support good causes during times of quiet as well as times of struggle. This will prepare the union to better face the future, no matter what it may bring.

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